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2005 Exhibitions
Traditionally Oral
November 28 to January 10, 2005

Traditionally Oral is like an onion with its layers of complexity. It plays with the notion of food being used as a nurturer and for social interaction. Plus, it works on the cyclical nature of our relationship with food: it feeds us and nurtures us and then we feel better. In this way, that food is self-sacrificing for our benefit.

Traditionally Oral sees food following many of Ayn Rand’s theories of objectivity. The food in this exhibit has been liberated from its servitude role with human beings. Gum wads are painted and exhibited for their own particular placement in life. In the same way, teabags and fruit peelings have been rescued from the garbage can and allowed to literally transform into aesthetic objects of contemplation. Metaphorically, this food is going from the literal, feed me, to the more cerebral, feed my mind.




2005 Exhibitions
OffGuard
Naomi Freisen, Paula Reban, and Mark Ballantyne
Toured by OSAC/curated by Oden Merzsolf


Three emerging photographers; Naomi Freisen, Paula Reban and Mark Ballantyne, working through the Art & Art History Department of the University of Saskatchewan, traveled around the province meeting and photographing individuals who were willing to share their stories.

Every year Saskatchewan experiences an average of 21 deaths and 300 injuries as a result of farming accidents. The Centre for Agricultural Medicine conceived this project as a means of recording the effects these accidents have on the lives of the people involved and as a challenge to others to learn safe working practices to adopt for their own use.





2005 Exhibitions
100 Years of Saskatchewan Art
January 14 to March 13, 2005

The Godfrey Dean Art Gallery is pleased to launch the Centennial year with an exhibit entitled "100 Years of Saskatchewan Art". On tour from the Mendel Art Gallery, Yorkton is the first venue for this retrospective. According to the curator, Alexandra Badzak, "....this exhibit provides us with an opportunity to trace the province's relatively short history through the impressive production of visual art in Saskatchewan. It has often been stated that Saskatchewan has more artists per capita than anywhere else in Canada–which leads one to question whether there are factors or elements that have inspired or shaped not only the cultural milieu of the province but also its cultural products."

Artworks by James Henderson, Ernest Lindner, Robert Hurley, Marshal Teitelbaum, David Thauberger, Joseph Fafard, Edward Poitras, Heather Cline, Dorothy Knowles and many more.


2005 Exhibitions
Magazine Series
Riel Benn
March 20 to April 24, 2005

Magazine Series by artist Riel Benn curated by Heather Smith and on tour through the Organization of Saskatchewan Arts Councils.








2005 Exhibitions
Essential Fiction
Stuart Mueller
May 5 to June 10, 2005

A photographic exploration of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, and an extended investigation of identity and the nature of the photographic image.

I have taken pictures of Moose Jaw since I moved here seven years ago. I have done this more or less casually - at the park, out in the fields, a series of black and white images from under the 4th Avenue bridge - but they failed to return the view of those places, this place, that I desired.

Something about the single frame - the limitations of any particular moment, perhaps - seemed to render the town flatly - without representing the way it felt to be there. It was a classic example of the confict between what we see - and what we know.

The multi frame panorama explodes the possibility of mistaking this photographic moment for a depiction of reality - although apparently coherent, the extreme angles, occasionally awkward juxtapositions, and the irregular shapes of each image - dictated by the rectangles of  the original exposures of which each image is constructed - all suggest to the viewer that these images (any images) exist as constructions - created through some particular desire.

- Stuart Mueller


2005 Exhibitions
Subverting Virtual Territories
Elwood Jimmy, Aboriginal Curator in Residence
May 2 - June 10, 2005

Over the last twenty-five years, Canada has evolved into one of the most digitally connected countries in the world. However in that time, government and corporations are increasingly moving toward an information and economic environment that is void of dissent and difference. As this colonization of the digital realm evolves, it is integral that a multiplicity of communities, voices and creative acts are included in the further development of the internet and digital technologies. Fortunately, there are many artists creating integrated media projects that provide critical and innovative perspectives on informational and technological phenomena that influence the social, political, economic and artistic domains. This exhibition attempts to provide a cross section of artists working in socially and politically charged practices that explore ideas surrounding self-determination, access, equity, surveillance and personal and collective identities

Over the last twenty-five years, Canada has evolved into one of the most digitally connected countries in the world. However in that time, government and corporations are increasingly moving toward an information and economic environment that is void of dissent and difference. As this colonization of the digital realm evolves, it is integral that a multiplicity of communities, voices and creative acts are included in the further development of the internet and digital technologies. Fortunately, there are many artists creating integrated media projects that provide critical and innovative perspectives on informational and technological phenomena that influence the social, political, economic and artistic domains. This exhibition attempts to provide a cross section of artists working in socially and politically charged practices that explore ideas surrounding self-determination, access, equity, surveillance and personal and collective identities.


2005 Exhibitions
100 Years of Yorkton

Gene and Betty Denischuk purchased the building on Broadway that is now the Frameworks. It was originally built by Levi Beck for his general store. The title said 1912, but when they began renovating this building, they found signatures and evidence from 1896, and this began their research into the history of Yorkton.

Gene and Betty saw how the old photos gave an accurate snapshot of a moment in Yorkton’s historical past. So they began to search for documents and to purchase historical photos from newspaper ads, internet searches and through E-Bay, and other auctions. Their documentary research has told them that their building, originally the general store, and at one time the library, is the oldest standing building in Yorkton. The Frameworks building dates back to 1895.

Today, Frameworks has a permanent display of plaque-mounted photos retelling Yorkton’s history.


2005 Exhibitions
Constitution
Colleen Wolstenholme, Helen Marzolf, Mike Macdonald, Robin Brass, Taras Polataiko
June 16 - August 5, 2005

Health, as a state, is intimately tied to factors such as environment, economics, education, and self-determination. Personal health, as a response to personal circumstances, is therefore naturally managed on a number of levels - by the individual, the practitioner, the expert, the community, and the state. Absent from the western complex of modern medicine are concerns about the disconnect between the sources of medicine, or good health, and the politics of health management. Constitution, an installation of works from five artists, delves into this disconnect. Curated by Lynn Acoose.



2005 Exhibitions
The Butterfly Garden
Mike MacDonald

New media artist Mike MacDonald installed The Butterfly Garden in front of the Godfrey Dean Art Gallery in conjunction with The Garden Project, an interdisciplinary arts project developed by Lynn Acoose, the Gallery's Aboriginal Arts and Culture Leader.

MacDonald creates video installations and unique gardens to help draw attention to environmental and social issues. Born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, of Mi’kmaq, Boethuck, Irish, Portuguese, and Scottish ancestry, his heritage is an integral part of his work.

Drawing his inspiration from aboriginal medicine, ethnobotany and the science of plant/insect interdependence, MacDonald creates site-specific gardens in urban settings as a “medium for healing and increasing consciousness.” Traditional native medicinal plants are used to attract numerous species of butterflies and help create calm, peaceful sanctuaries for humans. The gardens frequently allude to local history, re-layering native plants and wildlife over the impacts of contemporary settlement.


2005 Exhibitions
Poundmaker's Garden
Sandra Semchuk & James Nicholas
Elwood Jimmy, Curator

August 18 - October 2, 2005

The Godfrey Dean Art Gallery is honoured to present the work of Sandra Semchuk and James Nicholas as part of the gallery’s summer-long program marking the Centennial anniversary of the province of Saskatchewan. The photo, text and video collaboration that comprises Poundmaker’s Garden allows the community of Yorkton to bear witness to an historically overshadowed, but nonetheless important narrative that has contributed to the development of the mind/landscape now known as Saskatchewan.

Poundmaker’s Garden presents but one of the many intersections between the Indigenous and the non-Indigenous within the time frame of western expansion.  Semchuk and Nicholas have utilized the landscape as both a starting point and focal point for historical and artistic inquiry into one of the many significant plains narratives and individuals alive in memory and archive. Through this exploration, they have privileged this particular narrative and knowledge within a critical and contemporary context. The garden itself acts as a rich visual and metaphorical link to ideas arising from a community’s past, present and future. Through their work, Semchuk and Nicholas have developed a space for the viewer to reflect and engage in thought around concerns surrounding history, community, cooperation, restorative practices, and art.

In their collective body of work, Semchuk and Nicholas have facilitated the dissemination of the rich and diverse knowledge bases housed with the plains region of Canada.  In this exhibition, the collaboration with Eric Tootoosis - a direct descendant of Poundmaker, envelops the audience within a Cree dialectic and worldview that runs parallel yet distinct from ‘official’ Euro-Canadian histories.  By engaging in and incorporating community discussion, storytelling (oratory), historical research, ethno-botanical research and ecology and culturally based principles within their work, they provide a visual and textual narrative ripe with knowledge from which we can derive a greater and richer understanding of past and present self-concepts as individuals, and as a community.


2005 Exhibitions
Godzilla vs. Skateboarders
Organized by the Dunlop Art Gallery
Artists: Mowry Baden, Aaron Carpenter, Fastwürms, Shaun Gladwell, Sandee Moore, Alex Morrison and Juan Carlos Pérez Trejo
Anthony Kiendl
, Curator
August 18 - October 23, 2005

This exhibition gathers together artists who use the culture and practice of skateboarding as a means to critique architecture, social spaces, and the values constituted by those spaces. There are now an estimated 20 to 40 million dedicated practitioners of skateboarding worldwide. As British architecture critic Iain Borden states, “[Skateboarding’s] representational mode is not that of writing, drawing, or theorizing, but of performing –– of speaking their meanings and critiques of the city through their urban actions. Here in the movement of the body across urban space, and in its direct interaction with the modern architecture of the city, lies the central critique of skateboarding –– a rejection both of the values and of the spatio-temporal modes of living in the contemporary capitalist city.”


2005 Exhibitions
Dancing With Ghosts
Garry Harris, Monica Fraske Bornyk, Crystal Thorburn, and Judy Niebergall
Brenda Sherring, Curator

August 18 - October 23, 2005

The cultures that make up a community are complex. There are cultures within cultures. It is the mix of all of these subcultures that make us who we are today and give us our identity as a community and form our future goals and aspirations.



2005 Exhibitions
Surveillance in the Rock Garden
Edward Poitras
Lynn Acoose
, Curator
October 27 - December 9, 2005

The garden as cultural metaphor is indelibly rooted in the mass consciousness of all societies where human took trowel, hoe or plough to the earth. Whether referring to the human condition, the state of a nation, or the inner life of the individual, the garden as metaphor resides within the global zeitgeist, it’s present day significance strengthened by concerns for sustainability and the globalization of economies. The popularity of gardening, evidenced by the huge variety of magazines, television shows and consumer products devoted to the pursuit of gardening, is a particularly North American response to the global zeitgeist.